Japanese sports equipment maker ASICS launches Earth Day pack

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Japanese sports equipment manufacturer ASICS has launched a new cross-category collection of environmentally friendly footwear and clothing. This new planet-friendly Earth Day pack was created using a circular manufacturing approach that recycled around five tonnes of textile waste, the equivalent of 25,000 t-shirts, into new shoes.

The pack includes many popular products from the ASICS running, court and Sportstyle ranges, including the Gel-Nimbus 23, Glideride 2, Gel-Resolution 8 and Tarther Blast, as well as a wide range of clothing. The insole of the shoes is developed using a resource-saving technology called solution dyeing that reduces CO2 emissions by about 45 percent and reduced water consumption by about 33 percent compared to conventional dyeing processes, the company said in a press release.

“We are committed to playing our role in building a circular economy that contributes to reducing CO emissions2 emissions and keep global warming below 1.5?. It is said that only 1 percent of the world’s textile waste is recycled while more than 70 percent of clothing ends up in landfills or incinerators. By continuing to innovate the manufacturing process across all of our product categories, we can help build a circular economy and mitigate the impact of climate change, ”said Yasuhito Hirota, President and COO of ASICS .

Each piece in the new Earth Day pack includes a sunflower logo as well as an intricate seed graphic representing ASICS ‘continued commitment to sowing the seeds for a better future. The two arrows in the center of the emblem mark the brand’s ambition to contribute to the construction of a circular economy. The launch of the Earth Day Pack follows the Sunrise Reborn Pack release earlier this year.

Fibre2Fashion Information Office (KD)

Japanese sports equipment manufacturer ASICS has launched a new cross-category collection of environmentally friendly footwear and clothing. This new planet-friendly Earth Day pack was created using a circular manufacturing approach that recycled around five tonnes of textile waste, the equivalent of 25,000 t-shirts, into new shoes.


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